In Zambia, fresh, clean water is a precious commodity.

And not only is ensuring there is enough safe water for people to drink and for domestic and hygiene purposes difficult enough, it is even harder to create available water resources to adequately irrigate crops.

That is why in October, 2014, Bread and Water for Africa® awarded a $20,000 grant to our partner there – Kabwata Orphanage & Transit Centre – for a water well for its gardens.

Kabwata founder and executive director Angela Miyanda reported in December that the crops have been planted and a reservoir has been constructed to make sure there will be a steady supply of water. The reservoir will ensure that those crops not only survive, but thrive, during their two-month growing period.

“With the reservoir in place, the project will manage to get enough clients that will support the project,” Mrs. Miyanda told us.

“Water is being shared amongst so many residents,” she added. “The area where the project is situated is a farming one and many people have shifted here. After having three wells in place, water was still not adequate for the project. The project has since set up the water reservoir for storage for irrigation.”

The wells, reservoir and irrigation project have paid off in multiple ways.

“Older children have been participating in the daily works around the farm project,” Mrs. Miyanda said. “This opportunity is used as a practical lesson for them to appreciate and learn a skill which may be an advantage to their future. It has inspired and motivated many people who are willing to assist in their own ways. Over the last two years, the program has proven to be a steady source of income. Proceeds made from the sale of garden crops have either been used to sustain and develop the project and/or to assist individuals as reasonable need arises.”

Local communities have been integrated in the program by empowering them with a sense of community participation. Instead of expecting only to receive benefits from the project, they now offer their services willingly to aid in the growth and sustenance of the project. The biggest strength has been the formal training of two staff members for the project. Irrigation and plant maintenance have been formally organized and are being implemented by Kabwata’s own staff.

Despite the success, Mrs. Miyanda is realistic that it is still going to take some time before the garden project can be completely self-sustaining.

“In order to take the project further, we may encounter some challenges which may need your support,” she said. “However, our intention is to have the project stand on its own.”

And thanks to supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® like you, she is well on her way to realizing that goal.