Devastating  Flooding and Mudslides have hit Sierra Leone

Devastating Flooding and Mudslides have hit Sierra Leone

Devastating flooding and mudslides have hit Sierra Leone washing away entire communities on the outskirts of Freetown.

Bread and Water for Africa® is responding to this emergency. Days of torrential rain have created terrifying mudslides in northern Sierra Leone, where our partner Faith Healing Development Corporation works to provide schooling, health care, and food to the thousands of poor. Thousands are feared dead and missing, and Rev. Mambu, FHDO Executive Director, reports that the situation is dire, with children in his care injured, and tragically, dead.

Massive flooding has left tens of thousands without shelter. Another deadly outbreak of cholera is a near certainty. We are air freighting a container of emergency medical supplies tomorrow that can help meet the needs of 20,000 individuals.  Next week, we will also need to ship tons of disaster relief supplies, supplies, including medical, hygiene, and other relief materials.  We must send as large a supply as we can. And with our donors, we will send funds to buy bottled water, medical supplies, water purification tablets, and oral rehydration kits. We are responding, with the caring and urgent support of our donors and partners.

School Fees Won’t Prevent an Education for These Children

School Fees Won’t Prevent an Education for These Children

Any child living anywhere in the world is destined for a life of poverty without an education.

Nowhere is that more true than in sub-Saharan Africa which in no way could be described as “a land of opportunity” for those who can’t read or write, add or subtract of have a general knowledge of the world.

Theirs is a life of struggle and despair with no hope for anything better in their life than to labor hard – if they are fortunate enough to find work – eat for a day, and have a place to sleep for the night.

That’s why Bread and Water for Africa® provides funding for school fees and school uniforms for hundreds of children each year in several African countries.

For example, in Cameroon, our partner there Hope Services, enables deserving children whose greatest wish in the world is to go to school with funding provided by supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®.

This year, Hope Services Director Esther Ndichafah expects to enable more than 200 underprivileged children including orphans and what she calls “persecuted children” to go to school, giving them their only chance for success in life.

Her mission, she says, is to give “the underprivileged the same opportunities to be educated like others” and helping transform “poor children into established self-reliant individuals” by encouraging academic excellence.

At Bread and Water for Africa® Esther’s mission is our mission. We strongly believe that education is not a key to success, it is THE key to success.

In the villages of Bangolan and Babungo in Cameroon, as well as Lolo in Chad, secondary school tuition is extremely inexpensive compared to what it costs to educate a child in the United States.

That is unless you are a poor orphan and then it may as well be $1 million.

In Kenya, Bread and Water for Africa® provides funding for secondary school students living at the affiliated Lewa Children’s Home as well as sponsored children in the local community.

Stella Keino of the Lewa Children’s Home stated that by providing school fees for orphans living at Lewa and others “This benefits the Eldoret community and the country as a whole.”

Stella sees short term, medium term and long term outcomes for the students.

In the short term, children will be able to go directly to high school without any disruption to their education with funding for the school fees in place from the start of the school year to the end.

In the medium term, children will be able to attend all the years of high school without worry of how they will pay their school fees year after year.

And in the long term, the students will be able to attain a higher education than they otherwise might not have been able to “and develop themselves to be better citizens.”

In Zimbabwe, working with our partner there, Margaret Makambira, director of Shinga Development Trust, 30 primary school students and 20 secondary school students, will benefit from our school fee support program.

Margaret firmly believes, as do we, that an educated population will empower the nation, build healthy communities and lead to a long-term goal of self-sufficiency as she works to eradicate illiteracy in her community, one child at a time.

The result of our efforts – all of us, Bread and Water for Africa®, our grassroots partners working every day to better the lives of children in the communities, and you, our supporters who make it all possible – is that today hundreds of children are in school instead of the streets, and tomorrow they will have a bright future, leading the way for thousands to follow.

The Construction of the Dr. Kenneth Gerdes Primary School (Cameroon) is Complete!

The Construction of the Dr. Kenneth Gerdes Primary School (Cameroon) is Complete!

Bread and Water for Africa® is proud to announce that the construction of the Dr. Kenneth Gerdes primary school in Cameroon is completed and its doors have just opened to students eager to begin a brand new school year in a brand new school building.

Last year, construction began on the K-5 school building, with more classrooms to come, and we couldn’t be more pleased to hear from school President Julius Esunge that the 130 children who have enrolled now have the opportunity for a quality education.

“We are excited that this dream is coming to fruition,” he added.

And so are we here at Bread and Water for Africa®. There is nothing we love doing more than seeing a person with a dream to help others – literally making the world a better place – realize their dream.

You can see for yourself the smiles on the faces of the happy children who can now rejoice as they too are realizing their dream, a dream of an education and a successful future.
Watch here:

Thanksgiving is a much different experience for everyone

Thanksgiving is a much different experience for everyone

Every year on the fourth Thursday of November millions of Americans across the United States gather with their families and friends for a huge turkey dinner with all the trimmings and giving thanks for all the blessings they have received in life.

In sub-Saharan Africa, with the exception of a few Americans residing there, it will be just another day.

But despite the hardships and challenges facing citizens of countries where Bread and Water for Africa® works in partnership with grassroots organizations including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and elsewhere, there are tens of thousands who have plenty of reason to be thankful.

In 2016 alone:

  • In Cameroon, more than 250 children benefited from the completion of a school, and another 142 orphaned and destitute primary and secondary school students benefited from school fee support.
  • In Ethiopia, 86,000 citizens are thankful for the medical services they received through five hospitals and a clinic supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, while another 12,400 students benefited from a shipment by Bread and Water for Africa® of 22,000 books which was distributed to 20 secondary school libraries.
  • In Kenya, 74 orphaned an abandoned children are thankful to have found a loving home at the Lewa Children’s Home, while another 400 Kenya students from nursery to grade eight benefited from an education provided to them at the KipKeino school, constructed nearly 20 years ago by Bread and Water for Africa®.
  • In Sierra Leone, more than 76,000 residents are grateful for the healthcare services received through hospitals and clinics supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, 3,000 students and local residents benefited from having access to clean, safe water by a well dug by Bread and Water for Africa® on the school grounds, and another 1,006 students are thankful for the education they received at four nurseries, four primary schools and three secondary schools.
  • In Zambia, 93 orphaned children are thankful to have a loving home which provides for all their basic needs and another 146 children living in foster care are grateful for the food support, assistance with school fees and basic health care support they receive.
  • In Zimbabwe, 207 children are thankful for an orphan feeding program supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, while 35 secondary school students are grateful for the opportunity to continue their education through our school fee support program.

But the credit doesn’t belong to us – it goes to you – supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® who without which none of this would be possible.

 

Cassava… one of the “two of the main pillars of West Africa’s food security…”

Cassava… one of the “two of the main pillars of West Africa’s food security…”

A recent report in the Concord Times of Sierra Leone confirms what we already knew here at Bread and Water for Africa® — that cassava, along with maize, has been identified “as two of the main pillars of West Africa’s food security that could form the backbone for a thriving agro-industry in the sub-region.”

That’s why we are working with our partner in Sierra Leone, Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO), to construct a plant to process cassava into flour, known as gari, which is a food staple in the country. 

As FHDO Executive Director Rev. Francis Mambu explains, FHDO will provide 500 female farmers with cassava seedlings to plant on their small tracts of land, who will then sell the mature cassava root to FHDO, which will process the cassava into gari. Then the women will purchase the gari in bulk at wholesale prices which they can sell at their local markets – effectively making two profits on the same  product.

 The study recently released by the Food and Agriculture Organization and the International Fund for Agricultural Development entitled “Rebuilding West Africa’s Food Potential” pointed out that countries in West Africa such as Sierra Leone, one of the poorest in the world, “can realize full agricultural potential if they boost productivity, foster competitiveness and ensure than small-scale farmers have greater access to markets.”

And that is exactly what FHDO with help from our supporters here at Bread and Water for Africa® is working to accomplish.

Read more at http://slconcordtimes.com/maize-cassava-identified-as-west-africas-food-security-pillars/

One Dream… From Banana Plantations to Fish Pond… All for the Orphanage

One Dream… From Banana Plantations to Fish Pond… All for the Orphanage

The proverb may be a cliché, but that does make it untrue to say “give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.”

In Zambia, that’s exactly what Bread and Water for Africa® partner Kabwata Orphanage & Transit Centre is proposing to do, albeit on a much larger scale.

Angela Miyanda, director of the Kabwata Orphanage, founded the home in 1998 out of compassion for vulnerable and disadvantaged children in Zambia to provide them basic necessities of life.

“Through the provision of education, shelter, health, nutrition, love and security we try to help the children reach their full potential in life,” says Angela.

To assist in the funding of the orphanage leading to self-sufficiency, she has created a banana plantation, which has expanded over the years because of its success and competent management, as well as a vegetable garden.

IMG_0226 Angela and bananas

“Our long term goal is to achieve self-sufficiency,” said Angela. “In order to do this we plan to expand our income generating projects.”

But now, Angela is busily working on another income-generating project with help from Bread and Water for Africa® – fish farming.

The short, medium and long term goals for the fish farm is to first learn the guidelines to dig a fish pond and gain experience in its operation and then expand from there.

In addition, Angela notes that some of the older children at Kabwata will be included in the project for training as preparation for the time when they move out of the orphanage.

Angela said she has already acquired the land, and that it only takes a week to actually dig the pond, another 10 days to prepare the ponds for stocking and that the time to harvest will be between 90 and 120 days.

Angela is proposing two dig two ponds that will contain 3,000 fish each with additional stocking to occur at six-week intervals for continuation and projects making between $8,000 and $10,000 annually in profits.

In total, Angela estimates the fish ponds will result in the production of 24,000 fish annually. About a third of the fish –8,000 – will be used to feed the children at the orphanage, with the other two-thirds being sold at local markets to raise operating funds for Kabwata towards its goal of reaching self-sufficiency.

She has also already established a relationship with various shops that sell farm produce every day and they will be able to get from the project.

Initially, a group of six people will be necessary to operate the fish farm, as well as a farm manager with experience in fish farming and a supervisor with knowledge of water reticulation.

In requesting grant funding to dig the ponds, Angela comments that Kabwata has been a partner with Bread and Water for Africa® since inception.

“Today we look back at the many achievements and we are amazed at what faithfulness can be when two partners come together for the assistance of vulnerable people,” she said.

“We are aware, that with time, the project will need to stand on its own for its continuity. The time is getting close and indeed we are getting ready to be weaned.

“Words will never be enough to pay our gratitude to the entire team of Bread and Water for Africa®. Children in the project have made higher than they ever expected. They are a testimony of what love can do.

“Thank you Bread and Water for Africa®. We will never disappoint you.”