Kobby’s Story -Lewa Children’s Home

Kobby’s Story -Lewa Children’s Home

Kobby was abandoned when she was only 7 years old and the first home she can remember was the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret.

“When I came to Lewa Children’s Home, I felt good,” Kobby said. “I attended KipKeino Nursery School and I have continued learning there up to now, where I am in Class 5.”

At Lewa, Kobby has everything she needs.

“I am happy,” she says. “We are fed well every day, we eat a balanced diet, and we are given enough clothes and shoes.

“We are not all the same age, there are small babies brought to the home and I enjoy helping them in the mornings and evenings because I love babies so much.

“In the mornings when we wake up we are well, we play in a clean field, the place where we sleep is clean, we have cupboards to put our clothes, there are toilets.”

In school, her favorite subject is Christian Religious Education where she learns about the Bible and the story of Jesus and his disciples.

“We learn how God created the earth and we learn so many things I can share with others,” she said.

She does acknowledge that some subjects are more challenging for her than others.

“I learn well, but sometimes I can’t understand some subjects,” she told us.

Only a fifth-grader, Kobby already has big dreams for her future.

“When I grow up I want to be a doctor because I want to help those who are sick,” Kobby said. “I want to treat them so that they can enjoy their life again. Even when my family, friends, relatives, and others become sick, I would like to treat them so that they can be healed.”

Kobby has years to make her dream a reality.

For now, she can enjoy being a child without worry or fear for the future thanks to Phyllis.

“I cannot remember when I lived, or my family, but I know my home is the Lewa Children’s Home,” Irene said. “Life here at Lewa is cool and I love being here.”

Why solar power?

Why solar power?

You may have heard that we plan to install solar panels at Lewa Children’s Home in Eldoret, Kenya.

But you may be asking yourself, “why solar power?”

The answer is simple. We want to provide a brighter future for African children, and solar power does precisely that for the children of Lewa.

How does solar power help the children of Lewa? 

Energy costs are a big drain on resources that could otherwise be used to provide food, housing, and education to these children. By installing solar panels at the orphanage, energy costs are lowered and thus more resources can be allocated to provide for these critical needs.

To learn more about Lewa Children’s Home, please visit here.

Thank you for all of your support.

The power of Solar Power

The power of Solar Power

Africa is “going green” and we are doing our part to take advantage of the tremendous amount of solar power potential available throughout the continent.

As reported recently by Africa.com, Africa has an immense energy crisis. With a population of close to 1 billion, there are 625 million people living without power – nearly 70 percent of the population.
“Africa has much greater solar resources available than any other continent because it is the… sunniest continent on earth,” notes Africa.com.
Kenya is taking the lead in promoting solar power. More of the country’s residents are getting power for the first time, installing solar panels, and reducing or eliminating their dependence on the grid.

In 2017, we installed solar panels on the roof of a clinic in the town of Kericho enabling doctors and staff to have hot water for washing, as well as keeping the facility itself more sanitary.

Three years ago, working with our partner, the Christian Health Association of Sierra Leone, we shipped solar panels. The panels were placed on the roofs of clinics and hospitals in regions of the country where running a power line would be impossible.

This year, we are hoping to install solar panels on the roof of our long-time partner, the Lewa Children’s Home in Kenya. Although the home for orphans is connected to the country’s electric grid, having the solar panels will reduce their reliance on power from the grid. This reduction will cut their utility costs and free up those funds to benefit the children.

Renewable energy technology has the potential to reduce problems faced throughout the continent. We applaud the fact many small-scale are companies and start-ups, such as M-KOPA Solar in Kenya which sells solar home systems to low-income earners, are making large inroads in making green energy available for all.

Read more at https://www.africa.com/10-renewable-energy-start-ups-africa/

A Lesson of Love and Caring for the Children of Lerato Children’s Village

A Lesson of Love and Caring for the Children of Lerato Children’s Village

Alisa’s tale is a story of tragedy and hope. The little 6-year-old had gone through a lot in her young life – being physically and emotionally abused and becoming infected with HIV. She understandably is emotionally disturbed and has difficulty concentrating.But all is not lost for Alisa thanks to our partner in Zimbabwe, Shinga Development Trust which operates the Lerato Children’s Village.

There, she has found a home filled with love from her “sisters and brothers” and more importantly Alisa has found a place forever in the heart of her new-found “mother,” Shinga director Margaret Makambira. As Margaret told us of Alisa and the other Lerato children, “Their stories are sad, and they don’t know what real love and genuine caring is.However, we are certain that Alisa, who started first grade this month, in addition to what she is learning in school, is also learning that lesson of love and caring more and more with each passing day.

A success story from Zimbabwe

A success story from Zimbabwe

“One day I will be Dr. Daniel Kabweza,” says Daniel, who thanks to our supporters was able to not just attend school, but excel. He is now set to graduate and looks forward to going to university to study medicine.

Daniel is one of 58 primary and high school students in Zimbabwe who has benefited from our school fee assistance program for the past several years.As explained by our Executive Director Bethelhem Tessema, once a child is accepted into the program, we feel a duty to fund their education through high school graduation. “Once we start paying, we continue,” says Beth.

The future wasn’t always so bright for Daniel

“I lost my parents when I was very young and lived in the villages with my grandparents and some family members,” he told us. “Life for me and my sister was very hard in the hands of some relatives.”

And while some might give up all hope and believe there is no future for them, Daniel did not.

He did not know how it would happen, but he had faith – a faith that was realized through the generosity of our supporters and the love and dedication provided to him by our partner there, Margaret Makambira, founder and director of the Shinga Development Trust.

While it is because of our supporters that we are able to provide the funding for our school fee assistance program, it is Margaret who is able to spot those “diamonds in the rough” such as Daniel and enable them to reach their full potential – oftentimes more than they even realize for themselves.

His dream is to become a doctor. 

“I had a dream to become educated and become a medical doctor one day, but I did not know how this was going to be without a reliable source of funding until my friends took me to a Shinga program where I was selected to benefit from your education funding,” Daniel told us.

“This made me work harder at school and this year I finished high school,” he added. “I know I will pass and qualify for university. Thank you for your kindness and love. I have hope for a very bright future. God bless you all.”

Our supporters made Daniel’s story possible. 

And thanks to our supporters, hundreds of students just like Daniel have the opportunity not only to attend school but to successfully complete their education every year.