All because of our supporters, Bread and Water for Africa 2016 highlights include:

  • School construction completed in Cameroon
  • 74 orphaned children found a loving home in Kenya
  • 1,006 students received primary and secondary school education in Sierra Leone
  • 146 children in foster care received food support and assistance with school fees in Zambia
  • 207 children benefited from an orphan feeding program in Zimbabwe

Watch here how successful 2016 has been thus far!

Access to clean, safe and unpolluted water is a valuable commodity in many places in sub-Saharan Africa. It is estimated that 90 percent of all serious illnesses in Africa can be linked to contaminated water and poor sanitation.

fhdo-rutile-sl-2016-6-orphanage-wellFor decades, Bread and Water for Africa® has made providing access to clean water a key priority by digging wells, ensuring that thousands in the surrounding community no longer have to walk miles fetching water, and literally risking their lives drinking it.

Such was the case in the community of Rutile in Sierra Leone where years ago, working our local partner there, Faith Healing Development Organization, we were able to fund the construction of a well on the grounds of an orphanage providing safe water for all.

But that was before the mining operation “whose activities have resulted in the pollution of all source of drinking water” arrived, we were told by FHDO Executive Director Rev. Francis Mambu.

Sierra Leone is one of the leading producers of bauxite, an aluminum ore and the world’s main source of aluminum, and nearby mining operations have caused the water to be unusable.

However, there is hope. It is possible that with a processing plant, the contaminated water in the well can be filtered and packaged into what are known in the country as plastic “sachets” which can contain between 8 and 12 ounces of water.

water-sachets“These sachets are commonly bought and sold in all of the markets and streets throughout the country,” said Rev. Mambu who is proposing, with the support of Bread and Water for Africa®, to construct such a plant to not only restore access to safe, unpolluted drinking water for the community, but also provide a means of support to the orphanage where the well is located.

“From all indications, this project will be a lucrative one that will greatly sustain itself due to the demands of clean water in our mining communities, especially now that the dry season is about to begin,” Rev. Mambu told us.

The estimated cost for the processing plant is $16,000, and we at Bread and Water for Africa® are committed to supporting the project in the knowledge that not only will the processing plant restore safe water to those in the village of Rutile, it will also provide much-needed income to the orphanage so that orphaned children in the community will have a home to go to for years to come when there is nowhere else for them to turn.

Every year on the fourth Thursday of November millions of Americans across the United States gather with their families and friends for a huge turkey dinner with all the trimmings and giving thanks for all the blessings they have received in life.

In sub-Saharan Africa, with the exception of a few Americans residing there, it will be just another day.

But despite the hardships and challenges facing citizens of countries where Bread and Water for Africa® works in partnership with grassroots organizations including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and elsewhere, there are tens of thousands who have plenty of reason to be thankful.

In 2016 alone:

  • In Cameroon, more than 250 children benefited from the completion of a school, and another 142 orphaned and destitute primary and secondary school students benefited from school fee support.
  • In Ethiopia, 86,000 citizens are thankful for the medical services they received through five hospitals and a clinic supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, while another 12,400 students benefited from a shipment by Bread and Water for Africa® of 22,000 books which was distributed to 20 secondary school libraries.
  • In Kenya, 74 orphaned an abandoned children are thankful to have found a loving home at the Lewa Children’s Home, while another 400 Kenya students from nursery to grade eight benefited from an education provided to them at the KipKeino school, constructed nearly 20 years ago by Bread and Water for Africa®.
  • In Sierra Leone, more than 76,000 residents are grateful for the healthcare services received through hospitals and clinics supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, 3,000 students and local residents benefited from having access to clean, safe water by a well dug by Bread and Water for Africa® on the school grounds, and another 1,006 students are thankful for the education they received at four nurseries, four primary schools and three secondary schools.
  • In Zambia, 93 orphaned children are thankful to have a loving home which provides for all their basic needs and another 146 children living in foster care are grateful for the food support, assistance with school fees and basic health care support they receive.
  • In Zimbabwe, 207 children are thankful for an orphan feeding program supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, while 35 secondary school students are grateful for the opportunity to continue their education through our school fee support program.

But the credit doesn’t belong to us – it goes to you – supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® who without which none of this would be possible.

 

With your help this summer, Bread and Water for Africa® hopes to raise enough funds to construct a plant in Sierra Leone to process cassava into gari.

So exactly what is cassava?

While most Americans may not have heard of cassava, an edible starchy tuberous root, it is more commonly called “yuca” in Spanish and in the United States.

Cassava is the third largest source of food carbohydrates in tropical countries after rice and maize, and is a major food staple in the developing world, providing a basic diet for more than a half a billion people, including millions in Sierra Leone.

In addition, it is one of the most drought-tolerant crops, capable of growing in marginal soils. It was introduced to Africa by Portuguese traders from Brazil in the 16th century and is now an important staple food, replacing native African crops, and is sometimes described as “the bread of the tropics.”

And what is gari?

Gari is cassava root, dried and ground into flour and, according to our partner in Sierra Leone, Rev. Francis Mambu, executive director of Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO), is a popular West African food constituting a daily meal to some 150 million people worldwide.

Rev. Mambu tells us gari is not only rich in starch, but also very high in proteins and some essential vitamins and is very high in fiber which makes it very filling while preventing bowel disease.

One could say it’s the “superfood” of Sierra Leone.

But why would FHDO want to operate a cassava processing plant?

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The answer is simple, to provide income to women farmers – many who have taken orphans whose parents died in the tragic Ebola outbreak into their homes – as well as generating income for FHDO itself to operate its clinics and schools.

Already, FHDO has planted more than 10 acres of cassava to be distributed to women in the Yainkassa Village in the Bombali District who will plant them on their own land and tend to them until they mature and are ready to be harvested in six months. After the initial harvest, the women farmers will be able to continue harvesting the cassava at three-month intervals.

Once the processing plant is in operation, FHDO will be able to purchase all the cassava the women can grow, guaranteeing them a reliable place to sell what they produce at fair prices.

But then what will FHDO do with all the gari it produces?

And here’s the beauty of this whole plan – FHDO will sell the gari back to the farmers who grew it at wholesale prices so they can go out and sell in their local community markets, in effect selling the same product twice and making two profits.

Why is this processing plant so necessary?

“The people of Sierra Leone were seriously affected by the Ebola virus disease outbreak,” says Rev. Mambu. “Especially the women and children.”

Rev. Mambu told us that women from 11 villages – totaling about 500 farmers – have been targeted to participate in the project.

That amounts to 500 households with thousands of children, many of whom are Ebola orphans who would have nowhere to go except for the caring and compassionate women who have taken them in and given them a loving home.

These women need a steady income to provide for their own children, as well as the ones they have taken in. They need to be able to put food on the table for them – every day – pay their school fees and purchase school uniforms, to be able to pay the medical bills when they get sick.

And the cassava process plant will enable them to do just that.

Rev. Francis Mambu puts it this way: “Access to safe drinking water is a challenge. Presently, the community does not have a running tap.

“The school children travel far distances to fetch water which is really affecting their education.”

Not to mention putting their health and their very lives at risk by being forced to drink water from unsafe sources such as streams, ponds – even puddles in the middle of a muddy unpaved road – risking cholera, dysentery, Typhoid fever and parasites by sipping just even a mouthful.

But what other choice do these girls and their families have?

In 2015, Bread and Water for Africa® provided funding to Rev. Mambu’s organization, Faith Healing Development Organization, to dig a well at a school at the community known as Waterloo in Sierra Leone.

And right now, today, Bread and Water for Africa® is in the process of digging a well in the community of Hill Station which is scheduled to be completed by the end of March.

Imagine, children, primarily little girls who spend their days walking miles back and forth carrying as much water they can put on the their heads will instead be able to go to school.

And, they and their families won’t have to risk serious illness, and even death, drinking water from questionable sources.

Last fall, Bread and Water for Africa® was successful in applying for a $10,000 grant from the Neilom Foundation at the University of Maryland College Park to dig a well at Hill Station. A New Well for Hill Station, Sierra Leone.

Not only will the well serve the Imatt Primary School where it is to be located, allowing children to remain in school instead of fetching water and not taking a life-or-death chance every time they take a drink of water, but thousands of families will also be assured of clean, safe, uncontaminated water for drinking, cooking, washing and bathing – all from just one single well.

 

Bread and Water for Africa® has been awarded a $10,000 grant by the Neilom Engineering for Social Change Fund to build a water well in Sierra Leone.

The grant is being made available through the Neilom Foundation and the Center for Engineering Concepts Development in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, in partnership with the Center for Philanthropy and Non-Profit Leadership in the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland College Park.

“Our name reflects our highest priority to bring clean water to families, clinics, schools and entire communities,” stated Bread and Water for Africa® Executive Director Bethelhem Tessema, who noted that Bread and Water for Africa®, through partnerships with grassroots organizations in Africa, has provided water wells for tens of thousands of people in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Zambia and Sierra Leone.

The $10,000 grant funding will go towards building a hand pump water well to serve the Hill Station Primary and Secondary Schools as well as the surrounding community in Freetown, Sierra Leone. We will commit matching funds of $5,092 to fully meet to the total project costs of $15,092.

In 2015, we established a goal of building three wells in Sierra Leone, a country still recovering from the Ebola outbreak of 2014, by June 2016. The first of the three wells, in the community of Waterloo, is soon to be completed.

Bread and Water for Africa® has established a goal of building a total of three wells in Sierra Leone, still recovering from the Ebola outbreak of 2014 which continued into 2015, for FY 2016. The first well, in the community of Waterloo, is soon to be completed.

The Neilom Grant money, combined with the matching funds contributed by Bread and Water for Africa®, will make it possible to complete the second well early in 2016.

We will administer the grant with its partner, Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO), of Freetown , Sierra Leone, which have worked as partners for more than 10 years. Weather permitting, the construction of the new well could begin as soon as January and be completed by the end of March.

The need for such a well in Sierra Leone is great. The vast majority of the population does not have access to safe and clean water and nearly half of the population uses unprotected water as their primary source for drinking, bathing and washing.

We are extremely grateful to the Neilom Engineering for Social Change Fund for recognizing the need for a well in this community that will benefit thousands and literally save lives.

On behalf of these thousands, we say “Tenki” (“Thank You” in Krio, the national language of Sierra Leone).

Clean Water Program

Tragically, thousands of children die every year from water-borne illnesses that are easily preventable. Where there is unsafe water, there are diseases. In the rural communities of Africa, the need for clean water is extremely urgent and a top priority for Bread and Water for Africa®. Clean water. It should be simple, really. And you know this. Or do you? Take our quiz to find out.

Water is life!  We support programs that provide access to clean water and educate Africans about the vital importance of clean water for the prevention of diseases.

Bread and Water for Africa® supports the following programs for clean water development:

YETEEM Children and Destitute Mothers Fund, Ethiopia

Namunkanga Sustainable Farming Program, Uganda

Kabwata Orphanage and Transit Centre, Zambia

Faith Healing Development Organization

Our Programs

In Waterloo, Sierra Leone life has changed dramatically for the better in the past year.

Thanks to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®, children who had spent their days carrying water from possible contaminated sources are free from that drudgery and are able to attend the primary school in the village.

At the Waterloo clinic, patients being treated for illness and injury no longer worry if they will get even sicker by drinking unsafe water containing dysentery, E. coli or Typhoid fever or that their wounds would become infected by dirty water.

And for the community as a whole, entire families have access to all the clean, safe water they need to cook, wash and bathe.

All because of one single well.

Earlier this year, Bread and Water for Africa® learned from our partner there, Faith Healing Development Organization, that there was a great need for clean water in Waterloo that hundreds, even thousands, were contracting waterborne diseases and otherwise healthy people endured needless suffering, some even death.

We embarked on a campaign to bring a “Well to Waterloo” and our supporters responded with generous gifts enough to drill a well on the grounds of the primary school, which serves the nearby clinic, and which provides water enough for thousands in the village.

A year ago for the children, women and men of Waterloo ready access to clean, safe water was not even a dream.

Today it is the reality.

Bread and Water for Africa® has been drilling wells in countries throughout Africa for nearly 20 years and we have seen firsthand the transformation in the lives tens of thousands for whom clean water is no longer unattainable but readily available.

In the coming year, we have already identified three other communities in Sierra Leone that are just like Waterloo was, and by this time next year we intend to have wells drilled there providing clean water to thousands more.

We at Bread and Water for Africa® are thankful that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa appears to waning. We are hopeful that remains the case.

But, we also are saddened by the deaths of more than 9,000 children, women and men in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, who have perished during the past year due to the deadly virus, and the tens of thousands more whose lives have been devastated by the loss of loved ones – even entire families.

Despite the good news that the number of newly-contracted cases is on the decline, that doesn’t mean it’s over. In fact, dozens of West Africans are still being infected with Ebola in those three countries every week.

Tragically, even those not affected by the disease are suffering the consequences as food production and importation has dropped off significantly in Sierra Leone, where our partner organization Faith Healing Development Organization is located, leaving otherwise healthy residents of the country on the verge of starvation.

Hundreds of thousands of people are going hungry because of Ebola’s effects on farming, and relief agencies working there predict that the number will double in a few short months.

We are asking that you will continue your generous support to Bread and Water for Africa® as we continue our fight alongside FHDO, which operates numerous life-saving clinics in the desperately poor country, to ease the suffering of those for whom each day is a struggle to survive.

We are proud of role in helping to win the battle, but we need your help to defeat the Ebola virus and win the war.

Christian Health Org

CHASLWhile Ebola is the most immediate health concern in Sierra Leone, that does not mean that other equally life-threatening illnesses have vanished, and our partner there, Christian Health Association of Sierra Leone (CHASL), continues on its mission to meet basic health care needs for the residents of the country.

CHASL is comprised of 53 member institutions located throughout the country which include 10 general hospitals, two eye hospitals, 35 health centers and clinics and six faith-based non-governmental organizations with health promoting programs, according to its 2012 annual report.

Bread and Water for Africa® is proud to be a long-time partner with CHASL by providing hundreds of thousands of dollars in in-kind donations of medical equipment and supplies and medicines to ease the suffering of those being treated for malaria, respiratory tract infections, typhoid, severe diarrhea, HIV/AIDS and hypertension, as well as providing pre-natal and post-natal care for women and infants.

CHASL’s hospitals and clinics provide life-saving health care services to hundreds of thousands children, women and men annually and oversee the births of thousands of new Sierra Leoneans every year.

Through its hospitals and clinics, CHASL is able to provide services to those living in the most remote areas of the county thereby bringing about monumental change throughout the entire nation.

Bread and Water for Africa® is glad to be a part of that success – a success you help to bring about.

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