All because of our supporters, Bread and Water for Africa 2016 highlights include:

  • School construction completed in Cameroon
  • 74 orphaned children found a loving home in Kenya
  • 1,006 students received primary and secondary school education in Sierra Leone
  • 146 children in foster care received food support and assistance with school fees in Zambia
  • 207 children benefited from an orphan feeding program in Zimbabwe

Watch here how successful 2016 has been thus far!

Rev. Francis Mambu puts it this way: “Access to safe drinking water is a challenge. Presently, the community does not have a running tap.

“The school children travel far distances to fetch water which is really affecting their education.”

Not to mention putting their health and their very lives at risk by being forced to drink water from unsafe sources such as streams, ponds – even puddles in the middle of a muddy unpaved road – risking cholera, dysentery, Typhoid fever and parasites by sipping just even a mouthful.

But what other choice do these girls and their families have?

In 2015, Bread and Water for Africa® provided funding to Rev. Mambu’s organization, Faith Healing Development Organization, to dig a well at a school at the community known as Waterloo in Sierra Leone.

And right now, today, Bread and Water for Africa® is in the process of digging a well in the community of Hill Station which is scheduled to be completed by the end of March.

Imagine, children, primarily little girls who spend their days walking miles back and forth carrying as much water they can put on the their heads will instead be able to go to school.

And, they and their families won’t have to risk serious illness, and even death, drinking water from questionable sources.

Last fall, Bread and Water for Africa® was successful in applying for a $10,000 grant from the Neilom Foundation at the University of Maryland College Park to dig a well at Hill Station. A New Well for Hill Station, Sierra Leone.

Not only will the well serve the Imatt Primary School where it is to be located, allowing children to remain in school instead of fetching water and not taking a life-or-death chance every time they take a drink of water, but thousands of families will also be assured of clean, safe, uncontaminated water for drinking, cooking, washing and bathing – all from just one single well.

 

Bread and Water for Africa® has been awarded a $10,000 grant by the Neilom Engineering for Social Change Fund to build a water well in Sierra Leone.

The grant is being made available through the Neilom Foundation and the Center for Engineering Concepts Development in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, in partnership with the Center for Philanthropy and Non-Profit Leadership in the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland College Park.

“Our name reflects our highest priority to bring clean water to families, clinics, schools and entire communities,” stated Bread and Water for Africa® Executive Director Bethelhem Tessema, who noted that Bread and Water for Africa®, through partnerships with grassroots organizations in Africa, has provided water wells for tens of thousands of people in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Zambia and Sierra Leone.

The $10,000 grant funding will go towards building a hand pump water well to serve the Hill Station Primary and Secondary Schools as well as the surrounding community in Freetown, Sierra Leone. We will commit matching funds of $5,092 to fully meet to the total project costs of $15,092.

In 2015, we established a goal of building three wells in Sierra Leone, a country still recovering from the Ebola outbreak of 2014, by June 2016. The first of the three wells, in the community of Waterloo, is soon to be completed.

Bread and Water for Africa® has established a goal of building a total of three wells in Sierra Leone, still recovering from the Ebola outbreak of 2014 which continued into 2015, for FY 2016. The first well, in the community of Waterloo, is soon to be completed.

The Neilom Grant money, combined with the matching funds contributed by Bread and Water for Africa®, will make it possible to complete the second well early in 2016.

We will administer the grant with its partner, Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO), of Freetown , Sierra Leone, which have worked as partners for more than 10 years. Weather permitting, the construction of the new well could begin as soon as January and be completed by the end of March.

The need for such a well in Sierra Leone is great. The vast majority of the population does not have access to safe and clean water and nearly half of the population uses unprotected water as their primary source for drinking, bathing and washing.

We are extremely grateful to the Neilom Engineering for Social Change Fund for recognizing the need for a well in this community that will benefit thousands and literally save lives.

On behalf of these thousands, we say “Tenki” (“Thank You” in Krio, the national language of Sierra Leone).

Clean Water Program

Tragically, thousands of children die every year from water-borne illnesses that are easily preventable. Where there is unsafe water, there are diseases. In the rural communities of Africa, the need for clean water is extremely urgent and a top priority for Bread and Water for Africa®. Clean water. It should be simple, really. And you know this. Or do you? Take our quiz to find out.

Water is life!  We support programs that provide access to clean water and educate Africans about the vital importance of clean water for the prevention of diseases.

Bread and Water for Africa® supports the following programs for clean water development:

YETEEM Children and Destitute Mothers Fund, Ethiopia

Namunkanga Sustainable Farming Program, Uganda

Kabwata Orphanage and Transit Centre, Zambia

Faith Healing Development Organization

Our Programs

In Waterloo, Sierra Leone life has changed dramatically for the better in the past year.

Thanks to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®, children who had spent their days carrying water from possible contaminated sources are free from that drudgery and are able to attend the primary school in the village.

At the Waterloo clinic, patients being treated for illness and injury no longer worry if they will get even sicker by drinking unsafe water containing dysentery, E. coli or Typhoid fever or that their wounds would become infected by dirty water.

And for the community as a whole, entire families have access to all the clean, safe water they need to cook, wash and bathe.

All because of one single well.

Earlier this year, Bread and Water for Africa® learned from our partner there, Faith Healing Development Organization, that there was a great need for clean water in Waterloo that hundreds, even thousands, were contracting waterborne diseases and otherwise healthy people endured needless suffering, some even death.

We embarked on a campaign to bring a “Well to Waterloo” and our supporters responded with generous gifts enough to drill a well on the grounds of the primary school, which serves the nearby clinic, and which provides water enough for thousands in the village.

A year ago for the children, women and men of Waterloo ready access to clean, safe water was not even a dream.

Today it is the reality.

Bread and Water for Africa® has been drilling wells in countries throughout Africa for nearly 20 years and we have seen firsthand the transformation in the lives tens of thousands for whom clean water is no longer unattainable but readily available.

In the coming year, we have already identified three other communities in Sierra Leone that are just like Waterloo was, and by this time next year we intend to have wells drilled there providing clean water to thousands more.

Clean and safe water is such a scarce resource for so many, including in Sierra Leone.  Mothers, children, the sick, and indeed entire communities suffer from inadequate and unhealthy water in far too many communities of Sierra Leone.

That’s why this month, with our partner there, Faith Healing Development Organization, Bread and Water for Africa® will be drilling a much-needed well in Waterloo Community Sierra Leone to provide clean, safe water not only to the school where it will be located, but to a nearby clinic where uncontaminated water is critical to survival of the patients, as well as the community as a whole.

We have launched a 14 for 14 Matching Grant Challenge to raise the necessary funds – just $14,000 – to build this critically needed well.  This week, as World Water Day was celebrated on Sunday, March 22, there are so many reasons why this well is vital to this Waterloo community – including the 14 we are listing on our website through March 30.  14 facts for $14,000 life saving dollars Every dollar will be matched and will bring life-saving water to an entire community. We are working to raise awareness about the plight of so many that suffer from a lack of clean water with 14 important facts and raise $14,000 to drill that well.

Learn more facts about the necessity of clean and accessible water, and join us in our mission to ensure that the residents of the small village of Waterloo have something we all here in the United States take for granted – a steady supply of clean, safe water.

 

 

14Facts_Infographic_Web_Mar30

In Zambia, fresh, clean water is a precious commodity.

And not only is ensuring there is enough safe water for people to drink and for domestic and hygiene purposes difficult enough, it is even harder to create available water resources to adequately irrigate crops.

That is why in October, 2014, Bread and Water for Africa® awarded a $20,000 grant to our partner there – Kabwata Orphanage & Transit Centre – for a water well for its gardens.

Kabwata founder and executive director Angela Miyanda reported in December that the crops have been planted and a reservoir has been constructed to make sure there will be a steady supply of water. The reservoir will ensure that those crops not only survive, but thrive, during their two-month growing period.

“With the reservoir in place, the project will manage to get enough clients that will support the project,” Mrs. Miyanda told us.

“Water is being shared amongst so many residents,” she added. “The area where the project is situated is a farming one and many people have shifted here. After having three wells in place, water was still not adequate for the project. The project has since set up the water reservoir for storage for irrigation.”

The wells, reservoir and irrigation project have paid off in multiple ways.

“Older children have been participating in the daily works around the farm project,” Mrs. Miyanda said. “This opportunity is used as a practical lesson for them to appreciate and learn a skill which may be an advantage to their future. It has inspired and motivated many people who are willing to assist in their own ways. Over the last two years, the program has proven to be a steady source of income. Proceeds made from the sale of garden crops have either been used to sustain and develop the project and/or to assist individuals as reasonable need arises.”

Local communities have been integrated in the program by empowering them with a sense of community participation. Instead of expecting only to receive benefits from the project, they now offer their services willingly to aid in the growth and sustenance of the project. The biggest strength has been the formal training of two staff members for the project. Irrigation and plant maintenance have been formally organized and are being implemented by Kabwata’s own staff.

Despite the success, Mrs. Miyanda is realistic that it is still going to take some time before the garden project can be completely self-sustaining.

“In order to take the project further, we may encounter some challenges which may need your support,” she said. “However, our intention is to have the project stand on its own.”

And thanks to supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® like you, she is well on her way to realizing that goal.

world water day

Without clean water, people are forced to share watering holes with animals, allowing communities to easily contract waterborne diseases. In addition to poor water sanitation, children and young women must travel by foot up to five miles a day to get water for the family. By the time they get back home they are exhausted. Many of these children are unable to attend school regularly because they spend so much time traveling to retrieve water. 

The contrast is stark: the average American turns on the tap between 70 and 100 times a day while in Zambia 72% of people do not have access to clean water!

Bread and Water for Africa® raises the funds to build filtered water wells and water pumps, creating clean water sources for hospitals, schools, orphanages, and entire communities. The more clean water sources we help provide the more lives we are able to save. 

 Thank you so much for your help and for your continued concern for the children in Africa.

 

water

WATERThousands of children die every year from water-borne illnesses that are easily preventable. Where there is unsafe water, there are diseases. Where there is clean water and sanitation – there is health; there is life. Particularly in the rural communities of Sierra Leone, the need for clean water is extremely urgent. It is literally a matter of life and death.